#47) Yolanda Schofield

Yolanda Fiorentino Schofield, the wife of Arnold Schofield, was a graphic artist who worked primarily in pen and ink, and focused on historical landmarks. In the Romantic manner of Gianbatista Piranesi, 18th Century Italian Artist and engraver, she strived to create an awareness of and an appreciation for the legacy that these landmarks represent.

Born in 1922 and raised in the Boston area, she and he husband lived most of their married life in Geneva. It was here in the Finger Lakes area that Yolanda was inspired to create the pen and ink drawings of the historic landmarks that she so admired. Yolanda also lived in Verona, Italy, Germany, and Palm Bay Florida. As a young student she studied at the Museum of the Fine Arts in Boston, and later graduated from Boston University. Subsequently she enjoyed a successful career as a display artist and commercial decorator in Boston, Hartford and New York City. In Geneva, from 1975 until 1993, her drawings appeared in the Finger Lakes Times in a series entitled “Landmarks-Our Heritage“, raising public awareness of the historic legacy of the Finger Lakes Region.

Yolanda was a member of the Strawbridge Art League of Melbourne and the Brevard Historical Society. She taught in the Massachusetts and New York School System. Yolanda has exhibited at the Worchester Art Museum, the University of Massachusetts and is represented in private collections and institutions in New York State. She was commissioned to do the pen and ink history of the Erie Canal. Yolanda was released to the Lord on September 19, 2011.

From 1976 until 2008, Yolanda commissioned a series of 12 pen and ink drawings of Camp Babcock-Hovey, plus a rendering of the “New“ Scout Office in Geneva when it opened in 1987. These drawings are some of my the most cherished items of our camps history. Yolanda donated all the original drawings of Camp Babcock-Hovey to the Boy Scouts of America. They are currently housed in the conference room of the Sprague Service Center in Geneva.

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